Videos and media

Protect your beautiful fruit from Queensland fruit fly 

Queensland fruit fly is a pest, protect your beautiful produce by following these few tips.

  • Remove fruit trees that you don't want or need

  • Prune trees to keep them manageable

  • Cover you trees with insect nets while the fruit is still small

  • Use fruit fly traps to reduce numbers

  • Pick fruit early and thin out trees

  • Remove any leftovers and dispose of properly.

Let's be Queensland fruit fly warriors

 

Tricia, a community support officer with the Greater Sunraysia Fruit Fly Group is here to teach you a little bit about a flying insect called Queensland Fruit Fly.

 

There are lots of good insects that we find in our backyards – but Queensland fruit fly is a pest for our fruit growers and our fruit growing areas. So we’re going to have a closer look at fruit fly and why it’s especially a problem for us here in the Greater Sunraysia area.

Keeping your garden clean and tidy 

Keeping your garden clean and tidy helps to break the life cycle of the Queensland Fruit Fly.

  • Remove fruit trees that you don't want or need

  • Prune trees to keep them manageable

  • Cover you trees with insect nets while the fruit is still small

  • Use fruit fly traps to reduce numbers

  • Pick fruit early and thin out trees

  • Remove any leftovers and dispose of properly.

Traps and lures

Queensland fruit fly traps and lures are designed to attract and subsequently kill fruit flies making them a great tool to manage fruit fly in your garden.

Traps and lures can help keep numbers down, but they won’t entirely stop fruit flies damaging your fruit and they need to be used in conjunction with other control methods.

There are a number of different commercially available brands and designs of traps and lures. Or you can also make your own, really easily with things you already have around the house.

Planning your veggie garden

Plant vegetables in your garden that are not host fruits for Queensland fruit fly and will help avoid attracting flies to your garden.

  • Roots and bulbs e.g. beetroot, carrot, or potato

  • Leafy greens, stems, and pods e.g. lettuce, cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, or asian vegetables.

  • Herbs and spices e.g. rosemary, mint, basil, or parsley

  • Tough skin e.g.  Pumpkin, watermelon, cantaloupe, cucumber, or corn

If you still want to grow fruiting vegetables in your garden that are prone to fruit fly such as tomatoes, capsicums, chillies, and eggplants consider using an exclusion net. Consider the timing of applying nets to allow access to beneficial insects such as bees to pollinate the garden.

Queensland fruit fly 101

Andrew Jessup, a renowned entomologist who has been studying fruit flies for over 30 years sits down with the Greater Sunraysia Pest Free Area to discuss the behaviour of Queensland Fruit Flies.

Queensland fruit fly in your garden

Agriculture Victoria

Upload date: Feb 28, 2019

Length: 2m17s

This animated video gives a very quick introduction to Queensland Fruit Fly and it's impacts on a region. Other topics included are identification, life cycle and control methods. 

Gardening Australia - Fighting fruit fly

Series 26 Episode 26 

Broadcast 5 Sept 2015

This episode is a great starting off point in tackling QFF. Follow the links on our site for more in depth information.